Why a newer apartment may cost up to 4x the price of an older one

In Tokyo’s 23 wards, an apartment less than 5 years old sold for 49% more per square meter than one over 30 years old. In other words, an old apartment is about half the price of a new one on a price-per-square-meter basis. The difference was highest in Saitama Prefecture where an apartment under 5 years old sold for 3.7 times that of one over 30 years old.

 1,351 total views

The problem with trying to buy an abandoned ‘akiya’

The Japanese countryside is dotted with old, rambling shacks and farmhouses that look empty and abandoned. They can even be found in urban settings. You may think it’s a simple process of just pulling the title with the owner’s name on it, giving them a call and offering a few Yen to take the old home off their hands. And voila, you now have a charming fixer-upper of your own?

 2,586 total views,  28 views today

What does a concierge do?

A concierge is considered a value-add to a residential building and something developers will provide in higher-end properties in Japan. It is important to understand that concierges in Japan may not offer the same type of services that may be standard in other countries.

 1,843 total views,  6 views today

Home buying in Japan: Why that second bathroom may cost you

One of the most requested things we receive from buyers looking for two or three bedroom apartments or homes is for two full bathrooms. While this might be standard in many overseas markets, in Japan it is incredibly rare to find such a property. There are at most 2 or 3 condo-type buildings in Tokyo where 2 bathrooms are standard in all apartments, and these apartments are priced at the higher end of the market. In fact, 99.9% of current apartment listings in Tokyo’s 23 wards have just one bathroom.

 4,230 total views,  10 views today

New tax revision to allow 2% of building purchase price to be deducted

The government has decided to extend the home loan tax deduction program for new home buyers to allow a three-year period whereby a home owner could deduct up to 2% of the building portion of their purchase price from their income tax. This is an effort to help support the housing market this year when the consumption tax rate is scheduled to increase to 10% from October 2019.

 2,258 total views,  5 views today