Tokyo’s No. 2 Arterial Road to link bayside islands in 2022

The Tokyo government is aiming to have the No. 2 Arterial Road completed by 2022. This road will connect the man-made islands of Kachidoki, Harumi, Shin-Toyosu and Ariake with Shimbashi and provide more convenient access for trucks to access the new fish market and logistics facilities on the islands.

The opening of the road will be two years later than originally planned due to the delayed relocation of the Tsukiji Fish Market to Shin-Toyosu island. Part of the No. 2 road will need to pass through the fish market’s old location in Tsukiji, which means buildings will need to be demolished.

Sports stadium and mall likely to replace old Tsukiji fish market

Tsukiji Fish Market 3

According to insiders at a major Japanese real estate company, a sports stadium and shopping mall are being considered as a replacement for the former Tsukiji fish market site in downtown Tokyo.

The famous 80-year old fish market is scheduled to move to its new location on Shin-Toyosu Island in Tokyo Bay in early November 2016, leaving a 23 hectare site prime for redevelopment. The outer market, which has retail and restaurants catering to the general public, will remain in its current location, while the wholesale market will move to a much larger site in Shin-Toyosu.

Tsukiji makes World Monuments Watch List

Tsukiji

Tokyo’s Tsukiji district was listed by the World Monuments Fund on their 2016 World Monuments Watch List. The district’s early 20th century architecture, which includes small two- and three-story wooden shophouses, is considered to be at risk due to the urban redevelopment that will occur after the relocation of the Tsukiji Fish Market.

The Tsukiji area is located just south of Ginza. It was largely reduced to rubble and burnt fields following the 1923 Great Kanto earthquake, and the area’s neighbourhoods underwent a large re-shuffle. The fish market from Nihonbashi was relocated to Tsukiji and opened in 1935.

Compact Living in Tokyo

With typically high rents, tiny, cramped apartments are plentiful in Tokyo and there is no shortage of tenants looking for smaller, affordable accommodation. There is a boom in ‘one-room’, or studio apartments, as more and more young people move closer to Tokyo for work. Limited space has led to some creative designs, and this apartment building in Tsukiji called “CT7165” is no exception.